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Wisam Khoury is the brother of Jirjis Khoury who, with dozens of other LF supporters, was arrested in the aftermath of the 1994 church bombing in Jounieh. He was then a 22-year-old computer graduate. While most detainees were released after a relatively short spell in jail, Khoury underwent the same fate as his leader Samir Geagea and spent 11 years in solitary confinement.

Following the wave of arrests in the mid-1990s, thousands of LF members and former militants fled the country, mainly to France, Australia and the United States. With an eye on Jirjes? imprisonment however, Wisam and his family decided to stay. They were regularly harassed and threatened by members of the security services not to seek any publicity or legal action.

Amnesty International recognized both Khoury and Geagea as political prisoners and reported numerous human rights violations. According to Amnesty, the men had received an unfair trial and were held in ?cruel, inhuman and degrading conditions, in a manner detrimental to their physical and mental health.?

Jirjis Khoury told the military tribunal, for which he appeared without the possibility of appeal, that he was severely tortured during interrogation. He was beaten, repeatedly received electric shocks and was deprived of food and sleep for over 40 days. Also, all his toenails were crushed. Jirjes said he finally confessed to have bombed the church, because he was no longer able to stand the torture.

Following the Syrian retreat in April, Khoury and Geagea were finally released on July 26, 2005.

LF supporter Wisam Khoury in the LF camp, Martyrs Square, Beirut

2005, The Lebanese Forces, Beirut, Lebanon
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© 2005 Matthew Arnold Photography
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Wisam Khoury is the brother of Jirjis Khoury who, with dozens of other LF supporters, was arrested in the aftermath of the 1994 church bombing in Jounieh. He was then a 22-year-old computer graduate. While most detainees were released after a relatively short spell in jail, Khoury underwent the same fate as his leader Samir Geagea and spent 11 years in solitary confinement. <br />
<br />
Following the wave of arrests in the mid-1990s, thousands of LF members and former militants fled the country, mainly to France, Australia and the United States. With an eye on Jirjes? imprisonment however, Wisam and his family decided to stay. They were regularly harassed and threatened by members of the security services not to seek any publicity or legal action. <br />
<br />
Amnesty International recognized both Khoury and Geagea as political prisoners and reported numerous human rights violations. According to Amnesty, the men had received an unfair trial and were held in ?cruel, inhuman and degrading conditions, in a manner detrimental to their physical and mental health.? <br />
<br />
Jirjis Khoury told the military tribunal, for which he appeared without the possibility of appeal, that he was severely tortured during interrogation. He was beaten, repeatedly received electric shocks and was deprived of food and sleep for over 40 days. Also, all his toenails were crushed. Jirjes said he finally confessed to have bombed the church, because he was no longer able to stand the torture.<br />
<br />
Following the Syrian retreat in April, Khoury and Geagea were finally released on July 26, 2005.<br />
<br />
LF supporter Wisam Khoury in the LF camp, Martyrs Square, Beirut<br />
<br />
2005, The Lebanese Forces, Beirut, Lebanon