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"Ramzi disappeared on May 7, 2002," said Jocelyn Irani. "It was the birthday of our daughter. Two weeks after, he was found dead and clearly tortured, in the trunk of his own car." Ramzi, a civil engineer, was a student activist for the LF. Earlier in 2002 he had started a campaign of monthly sit-ins to demand the release of Geagea. The first took place on March 21 and attracted some 5,000 people.

"We were used to being interrogated," said the 36-year-old widow and mother of two. "But in the months prior to his death, it became worse. Every week an undercover agent came to the house asking questions to the concierge, not just about Ramzi, but also about me and the children. It was clearly an attempt to frighten us. But Ramzi always said: "if they don?t kill Geagea, why would they kill me?"

Ramzi was wrong. He was found after an anonymous phone call on May 21, the day of the monthly sit-in. While the official investigation lead to nothing, Jocelyn did some detective work on her own and was able to find some possible clues to his dissappearance and subsequent murder. The car of the man interrogating the concierge belonged to the Ministry of Interior, while an anonymous number that regularly appeared on Ramzi's mobile phone, belonged to someone at Lebanon's military intelligence service. Many people asked Jocelyn to push for an international investigation, but she never did. "I'm a mother alone with two children," she said. "I'd rather stay alive."

Jocelyn Irani on the terrace of her home above Dbayeh, north of Beirut. She is the widow of LF activist Ramzi Irani, who was kidnapped and found dead in the trunk of his own car.

2005, The Lebanese Forces, Beirut, Lebanon
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© 2005 Matthew Arnold Photography
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"Ramzi disappeared on May 7, 2002," said Jocelyn Irani. "It was the birthday of our daughter. Two weeks after, he was found dead and clearly tortured, in the trunk of his own car." Ramzi, a civil engineer, was a student activist for the LF. Earlier in 2002 he had started a campaign of monthly sit-ins to demand the release of Geagea. The first took place on March 21 and attracted some 5,000 people. <br />
<br />
"We were used to being interrogated," said the 36-year-old widow and mother of two. "But in the months prior to his death, it became worse. Every week an undercover agent came to the house asking questions to the concierge, not just about Ramzi, but also about me and the children. It was clearly an attempt to frighten us. But Ramzi always said: "if they don?t kill Geagea, why would they kill me?"<br />
<br />
Ramzi was wrong. He was found after an anonymous phone call on May 21, the day of the monthly sit-in. While the official investigation lead to nothing, Jocelyn did some detective work on her own and was able to find some possible clues to his dissappearance and subsequent murder. The car of the man interrogating the concierge belonged to the Ministry of Interior, while an anonymous number that regularly appeared on Ramzi's mobile phone, belonged to someone at Lebanon's military intelligence service. Many people asked Jocelyn to push for an international investigation, but she never did. "I'm a mother alone with two children," she said. "I'd rather stay alive."<br />
<br />
Jocelyn Irani on the terrace of her home above Dbayeh, north of Beirut. She is the widow of LF activist Ramzi Irani, who was kidnapped and found dead in the trunk of his own car. <br />
<br />
2005, The Lebanese Forces, Beirut, Lebanon