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"Protect Us" is written above the Jounieh church, where in 1994 a bomb explosion killed 10 people during morning mass. In front young people gather after services to talk during the elections of the summer of 2005. These were the first elections after the Syrian Army was forced to leave Lebanon since the infamous Civil War.

On February 27, 1994, a bomb exploded in the Our Lady of Deliverance Church in Jounieh, a Christian town just north of Beirut. It killed ten people and injured dozens of others. Father Antoine Sfeir remembers the event as if it happened only yesterday. ?It was about 9.15 AM,? said the 64-year-old priest, ?I was about to read Paul when two bombs exploded next to the statue of Virgin Mary left of the pepitre.?

Hit by shrapnel, the heavily bleeding priest was rushed to hospital. He stayed in intensive care for 70 days, lost 30 kilos, but survived. He was lucky in more ways than one, as the police later found three unexploded bombs in the organ. ?I already wondered why it sounded so off tune,? said Sfeir. ?We were saved by a 4-year-old girl who earlier that morning had climbed onto the pepitre and disconnected the wire.?
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© 2006 Matthew Arnold Photography
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"Protect Us" is written above the Jounieh church, where in 1994 a bomb explosion killed 10 people during morning mass. In front young people gather after services to talk during the elections of the summer of 2005. These were the first elections after the Syrian Army was forced to leave Lebanon since the infamous Civil War.<br />
<br />
On February 27, 1994, a bomb exploded in the Our Lady of Deliverance Church in Jounieh, a Christian town just north of Beirut. It killed ten people and injured dozens of others. Father Antoine Sfeir remembers the event as if it happened only yesterday. ?It was about 9.15 AM,? said the 64-year-old priest, ?I was about to read Paul when two bombs exploded next to the statue of Virgin Mary left of the pepitre.?<br />
<br />
Hit by shrapnel, the heavily bleeding priest was rushed to hospital. He stayed in intensive care for 70 days, lost 30 kilos, but survived. He was lucky in more ways than one, as the police later found three unexploded bombs in the organ. ?I already wondered why it sounded so off tune,? said Sfeir. ?We were saved by a 4-year-old girl who earlier that morning had climbed onto the pepitre and disconnected the wire.?